Trek BB95 GXP

Size Guide
Kit Type
Bearing Type

JUST THE FACTS:

BB95 is the mountain bike version of Trek's proprietary Direct-in-frame bottom bracket system. No cups or extra hardware required. With Trek BB95, the bearings press directly into the frame. Our Trek BB95 GXP Kits work with all GXP mountain bike crank systems from Sram and other manufacturers no matter how many chain rings you run.

How do I know if my bike needs a Repair Kit or a Standard Kit?

If a bearing or both bearings are loose in the frame bottom bracket shell while you are riding and/or can be installed or removed by hand with little effort when the crank has been removed from the bike, you need our REPAIR KIT.

If the Trek BB95 GXP bike bearings are snug in your frame’s bottom bracket shell, and you need to knock the bearings out mechanically, and need to use a press to install the bearings, order our STANDARD KIT.

What’s the difference between a REPAIR KIT and the STANDARD KIT?

Short Answer:

The Standard Kit uses VibraTite530 while the Repair Kit uses VibraTite538. Both of these compounds secure the bike bearings in place during use while allowing for simple removal and servicing by standard means when necessary and DO NOT have any effect on your frame’s warranty whatsoever. The 530 works better in tight spots while the 538 works best with a looser fit, so please order the correct kit for the best results.

Long Answer:

Many manufacturers, including Trek itself, are marketing “0.1mm oversize bearings” as a solution to the problem of bearing creak and bearing retention in Trek frames with bottom bracket bearing socket wear and for frames Trek admits might have a manufacturing variance that effects bearing fit. Either way, there is no way to know if their 0.1mm oversize is big enough or, as will be the case for most bikes, is actually way too big. Believe us when we say that 0.1mm is gigantic for bike bearings. Isn’t bigger a good thing? Answer: Only if it’s the right size, because bearings that fit too tight will not run smoothly, in many cases barely turning, and this means not just wattage-sucking, dismal performance, but a drastic reduction in bearing service life.

This is why we only use high-quality, standard size bearings with the right retaining compound and hardware to solve problems with Trek BB90 and BB95 bikes.

Note: Use appropriate tools such as our ownMaster Tool Set System for your installation and service needs.

ABOUT OUR BEARING CHOICES:

Ceramitech Bearings: Our Si3n4 hybrid ceramic bearings feature ultra-spherical silicon nitride balls matched to SAE 52100 chrome steel bearing races that have been processed with additional heat treatment and polishing steps. The result is a hybrid-ceramic bearing that lasts longer than any steel bearing with spin performance no steel bearing can rival. We’re so confident in the durability of our Ceramitech bearings that we back them with a Lifetime Bearing Exchange warranty. These bearings feature mid-contact seals for extreme performance and endurance. Each bearing comes lubricated with Kluber Isoflex Topas NB52. Lifetime Warranty.

WS2 Coated Ceramitech Bearings: We took our amazing Ceramitech bearings and added an extremely durable, tungsten disulfide (WS2) coating that has a 0.03 coefficient of friction---which means it’s slicker than Teflon, graphite, and even molybdenum disulfide. WS2 has an affinity for oils and greases, which means it maintains a hydrodynamic layer of lubricant where it’s needed most. The result is astonishing spin performance and increased endurance. These bearings feature mid-contact seals for extreme performance and durability. Each bearing comes lubricated with Kluber Isoflex Topas NB52. Lifetime Warranty.

ABEC-7 Steel Bearings: Crafted from SAE 52100 chrome steel, our BBInfinite ABEC-7 (ISO 492, Class 4) bearings are so buttery that you’d have to buy our Ceramitechs to find anything better. These bearings feature mid-contact seals for extreme performance and durability. Each bearing comes lubricated with Kluber or Koyo. 1-Year Bearing Exchange Warranty.

Bottom Bracket Selection Guide